Tag Archives: diversity

Embracing Difference with the Children’s Bureau

In August, LDIR had the opportunity to work with supervisors at the Children’s Bureau to support them in exploring how diverse identities within an organization influence approaches to difference and the impacts that has on an organization’s culture. We spent the day engaging in challenging but fruitful dialogue. One participant reflected, “It was the moments of discomfort that actually moved me the most.”

Participants were especially impacted by the introduction to cultural humility. The practice of cultural humility encourages people to be aware of and acknowledge their own barriers to understanding another’s culture. It helps to mitigate the distinctions between learning about another culture, relating to that culture or being a part of that culture. As the Children’s Bureau team discovered, this approach to navigating diversity is one that can create a culture of embracing difference.

What if Donald Sterling were a LDIR?

By Povi-Tamu Bryant, LDIR Program Coordinator

If Donald Sterling had the opportunity to become a LDIR, what would be different? LDIR participants learn to understand the way their positions in society shape how they interact with others and, in turn, how others interact with them. As a LDIR, Sterling would have had a chance to think about, discuss and understand the way his life was shaped by being able to afford to own a NBA team, being able to walk through the world without being negatively impacted by his race, and being able to benefit from his gender. This type of deeply personal reflection could have opened Sterling up to understanding the ways our different experiences–and intersecting identities–impact us. Sterling could have reflected on and changed his interactions with friends, colleagues, and the Clippers team with a critical awareness of how he has had a different level of access to resources.

Besides growing awareness, LDIR would have helped Sterling to build the skills needed to create equitable professional and social environments for those around him. LDIR would have helped Sterling understand that action is necessary for change. Sterling could have been a powerful ally, advocating for change that was informed by Clippers team members, women colleagues, LGBTQ peers and more. If Sterling were a LDIR, we would have a different NBA.

If every team owner in the NBA were to become a LDIR, the league would be stronger. When you understand that leadership requires self-awareness, you are positioned to create major shifts. Employees, players, and fans could have stronger investments in teams and the league, knowing that the leaders in the NBA understand the impacts of their power and are invested in building strong teams and relationships across difference. There is so much to be gained from having LDIRs at all levels, not the least of which is healthier work places and personal relationships. If all team owners were LDIRs, maybe no team would ever feel compelled to warm up hiding their logo.